11 responses to “Reinvention lessons from a bad melon”

  1. Debra Smouse

    Isn’t it funny when we choose not to take care of ourselves the way we know we need to, the Universe brings us back to the right path?

    Hope you are feeling better!

  2. Katie McClain

    Ok, well I love your take on this Sally! I have a bunch of things I need to too right now since I think I’m in the midst of a big reinvention. Great post!

  3. Katie McClain

    oops, need to “toss” right now.

  4. Mindy Crary

    I LOVE this analogy of bad cantaloupe; it seems so obvious that you don’t choose the experience of food poisoning (or maybe you needed it to gain this clarity), but what else is in our lives that doesn’t have enough contrast yet for us to understand that we’re settling for something less than we deserve?? I am gong to be thinking about this for awhile, thank you!

  5. Joanna Weston

    Wow, you have no idea how timely this message is for me! I have been making so many choices lately out of the belief that I “have to” make certain things work, and my body has been screaming at me to stop. Not that I’ve been listening….. Thank you clearly articulating something I could not!

  6. Blaze

    Hmmm, Sally,

    I have a different take on the situation, why do we have to toss it out…rather than salvage it?

    The way I see it, the melon wasn’t doing anything but being a melon. A melon grows from a seed, matures, becomes ripe, and then eventually when the time is right, it starts to wilt and die. It’s going through it’s life cycle, it’s neither good nor bad in my mind–rather it just is.

    And we, as human beings are always at choice. We get to choose whether we eat the melon or not. Sometimes we make a choice and wish we had made a different one with hindsight and more information. AND we made the best choice in the moment. No that we have more information perhaps we would like to choose again. Maybe it’s time to honor the life cycle of the fruit and honor the fact that it now needs to decompose and go back into the earth to become something else. We can help make that choice for ourselves and the fruit.

    It’s about honoring the process of life, we all begin and eventually we will all end. I don’t think it’s about tossing stuff, for me it’s more about the real work of noticing and being curious as to why I feel this way about the fruit, my life, and even my career. It’s about being at choice.

    Blessing to you and your continued health,
    Blaze

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